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Lancisi’s Sign: Giant C-V waves with Severe Tricuspid Regurgitation in Isolated Tricuspid Valve Prolapse
  • Sena Sert,
  • Özlem Yildirimtürk
Sena Sert
Istanbul Dr Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital
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Özlem Yildirimtürk
Istanbul Dr Siyami Ersek Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery Training and Research Hospital
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Abstract

IIntroduction Isolated tricuspid valve prolapse (TVP) is a rare finding on transthoracic echocardiography. Right atrial enlargement or prominent ” v ” waves as a consequence of hemodynamic changes in severe tricuspid regurgitation (TR) are rarely seen with isolated TVP. Here is a case of isolated prolapse of anterior tricuspid leaflet presenting with giant C-V waves also known as Lancisi’s sign. Case Report A 66-year-old male presented with increasing exercise limitation and leg edema in recent months and was complaining about the persistent pulsation at his neck and elevated jugular venous pulse with prominent systolic pulsation that represents giant C-V waves, also known as ‘Lancisi’s sign’ consequence of severe TR due to isolated prolapse of the anterior leaflet.The patients’ symptoms resolved completely after tricuspid valve replacement. Discussion TVP is best defined at parasternal short axis view with more than 2 mm atrial displacement (AD) of leaflet/leaflets. TVP can also be detected from four chamber view with more than 2 mm AD or in right ventricular inflow view with more than 4 mm AD. As a consequence of TVP, the physiological jugular venous waveform alters due to severe TR.During severe TR; retrograde blood flow through right atrium during ventricular systole restrains x descent and produces a fusion of c and v waves that appears as a large pulsation in physical examination called as ‘Lancisi’s sign’ Conclusion ‘Lancisi’s sign’ is defined as a large visible systolic neck pulsation as a consequence of the c-v waves fusion by preventing x descent during severe TR.